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20130117
20130117
STATION
CSPAN 5
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MSNBC 2
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> nearly 50 years after the march on washington, our work, dr. king's work, it is not yet complete. we gather here at the moment of great challenge and great change. in the first decade of this new century, we have been tested by war and by tragedy, economic crisis and its aftermath that has left millions out of work in poverty on the rise and millions more to struggle to get by. indeed, even before this crisis struck, we have entered a decade of rising inequality and stagnant wages, and too many troubled never across the country the conditions of our poor citizens appear a little changed from what existed 50 years ago. neighborhoods with underfunded schools and broken down slums, inadequate health care, constant violence, neighborhoods in which to many young people grow up with little hope and peace prospects for the future. >> president obama speaking in 2011 at the dedication of the martin luther king monument on the national mall in washington, d.c. journalist, author tavis smiley has spent the past year criss- crossing the country with activist and professor cornell west to start
up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: when we launched the show in january 2004, one of our goals was to become a destination for the biggest names in music not only for a place to perform in a late night setting but a comfortable setting for conversation. we found it strange that on most late-night shows, musicians perform but seldom ever speak. if you weeks after we launched the show were paid a visit by one of the biggest artists on the planet, prince. this was his first time ever appearing on pbs. we decided to start the show differently before jumping into a terrific conversation. good evening from los angeles. tonight, prince on pbs. ♪ tavis: i am a fa
that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> in october 2011 we were on our to be joined by leymah gbowee. she proved the difference of one single person can make in our world. she encourages the women of liberia to organize and fight for peace. that was the most important factor in the remarkable rise of backer's first female head of state. when she joined us back then to discuss her book, we had no idea that 48 hours after that conversation, she would go on to be awarded the nobel peace prize. let me start with this " on the back of the book. "she helped bring liberia out of the dark. her memoir is a captivating near to that will stand as testament to the power of women, face, and the spirit of our great co
the dr. martin luther king jr. whose birthday was yesterday and we'll celebrate monday the same day as obama's inauguration. it signifies how dr. king's activism was not just geared towards racial injustice but every bit as much towards social justice as well. while our country has made significant strides in racial equality it very. soften seemsoften it seems we're going the opposite way against poverty with nearly 50 million people now living at or beneath poverty. carrying the torch and renewing the battle against poverty is television and radio host author, activist tavis smily. now tavis's goal is to reduce poverty in half in ten years and completely eradicate it in 25. while that may seem like an impossible goal, let's remember another quote from dr. king. we must accept finite disappointment but never loss infinite hope. now joining me now is host of tavis smily on pbs and the tavis smily show on public radio international. >> thank you. >> why are we going the wrong way against poverty in this country? >> the elite number one. they also don't contribute to the campaigns of t
or to be doing in washington. the inauguration is on dr. martin luther king's birthday. >> the 21st of january. through four days prior on the 17th, we will be at george washington university for a live symposium on c-span and pbs and on public radio. we're talking specifically about how we get this president -- demanding, in fact, that he call a white house conference on the eradication of poverty. to his credit, the first thing he did four years ago when elector was on the lilly ledbetter. were demanding out what he called immediately on what has come for the on the eradication of poverty. let's craft a national plan to cut poverty and half in 10 years, to move toward eradicating it in 25 years. this is not a skill problem, it's a will problem. do we have the will to do this? if he wants to aim for the fences, if he wants to be a great american president, if he wants to leave behind a legacy -- and we read in the new york times from all his private talks with these his store and said that is what it wants to do, leave a legacy of the great transformational president -- we say take on the iss
assessment -- martin luther king, jr. [applause] so the president will clearly be in the foreground, but dr. king looms large as the backdrop. now, word comes from the white house that they will use his bible for this historic and iconic celebration, so we will talk tonight about how we honor the legacy of dr. king by focusing more attention on the issue that he gave his life for -- the poor. king once said we have to civilize ourselves by the immediate abolition of poverty. obviously, we are not quite there yet, but we of tonight's conversation will aid us and of that as in trying to make sure that we look out for the least among us. i am pleased tonight to be joined by an all-star panel. i want to introduce them one by one and jumped right into the conversation. i want to start by thanking c- span for carrying this program live around the world tonight. [applause] thank you, c-span. as the conversation gets under way, we will tell you more about what you can do at home or wherever you might be watching tonight to join in the conversation, but for now, let me introduce the novice panel of
silence of good people to become the status quo, to quote dr. king. we must empower them with the tools that they have and they need to move forward and that is why we spend so much time working together on these issues. we've been to the communities in south philly high school where we saw in one day alone 15 asian students who had to be taken to the emergency room as a result of a persistent pattern of harassment. they didn't speak the king's english. my father spoke ricky ricardo english as well and he would have been a victim of bullying under that circumstance. so we worked with the school district. we don't focus on the criminal prosecution of the specific bully. that's an important element and we work with our partners in local government on that, but our focus has been on the system's issues, of working with the school superintendents, working with the school districts to create a culture of inclusion, to create a culture where people can be accepted for who they are. we've seen bullying in the context of kids with disabilities, kids who couldn't get off the bus because th
to often as the appalling silence of good people that, as you recall, were dr. king's words from the birmingham jail. i've seen that all the time, people who are i think in their core good people who don't know what to do who tend to send the paradigm that boys will be boys and girls will be girls and we're trying to shift that paradigm. and that's why in okahenapen we have an accountability document that calls for --. >> (inaudible) with the idea, like i said, there is not a state going that we don't have a parent that has a dead child. we are dragging everybody to the party because at what point do we say, we can't even say, kids are dying. hundreds and hundreds of children have died when this should be the best times of their life and our most sensitive, compassionate, empathetic, our children are not surviving their childhood. >> one thing i've learned in my line of work, and again i want to thank you for your remarks and your doggedness, civil rights is about persistence. you exude persistence. i have attempted to live a persistent life. the civil rights act of 1964 was
:00 for the inauguration day on dr. king's birthday. tuesday through friday, we will be broadcasting from the sundance film festival, the 10th anniversary. cynthia has called in from chicago. thank you for that call. victoria has called in from yonkers. sandra has called in from missouri. edward has called in from new hampshire. we have had calls coming in from riverside, california. genet called in from texas. charles called in from san diego. keep the phone lines coming in. peter has called in from new mexico. marshall calls and from ohio. keep these phone calls coming in. we cannot do this without you. we have gotten phone calls from virginia, massachusetts, minnesota. martha call from quebec. we urge you to go to the fun right now and let us know that you are in the house. joseph called from that beautiful place of the red sand, moab, utah. it was great to be there just a little while ago. i was convinced that people have painted the town red for us but i was told it is always like that. michaelit has call from marylan. you will be getting a baseball cap. extremely popular. it has a statue of liberty,
conmemorando asi al doctor martin luther king junior... lilian mass nos tiene el presidente obama, en su pasada toma de posesiÓn inicio una tradiciÓn, para honrar la vida y el legado del reverendo dr. martÍn luther king, jr. . una tradiciÓn en la cual insta a toda la naciÓn a servir a sus comunidades el dia nacional de servicio " tenemos personal en los 50 estados y mas de 200,000 voluntarios que se han registrado para colaborar en ese dia y a lo largo del aÑo .. y tenemos miles de eventos en todo el pais para celebrarlo... porque queremos asegurarnos que aquellos que no pueden venir a la capital puedan participar .. un dÍa en el que la primera familia tambien se prestara a dar una mano.. y el cual llevara acabo en la alameda nacional mejor conocida como " national mall" el sÁbado 19 de enero 10 de la maÑana a 3:00 de la tarde " el dia nacional de prestar servicio a nuestra comunidad marcara el inicio de un fin de semana lleno de eventos para el presidente obama y el resto de la naciÓn .. este aÑo de nombro a la hija del expresidentes clinton, chelsea clinton como la president
fattah. >> thank you. we're about to celebrate the life and legacy of dr. king and we're reminded on that balcony in memory sis he was -- memphis he was shot down. president kennedy was shot. we are reminded in washington all the time of the dangers of guns. that's why you went through the security protection to come into this building. the supreme court ruled that everyone has a right to bear arms and it makes clear you can't bring them into the supreme court. so -- that is because we know guns are dangerous. so as much as people may proclaim one thing you have to look at their actions. on the floor of the house, we saw a member shot down once that's why we have bulletproof things and other kinds of protections. mayor nutter is someone growing up in west philadelphia, the best place in the world to grow up is a forecast councilman and is a mayor of our city, in so many respects he is the nation's mayor. we working on gun buybacks but he has had to counsel families of police officers who have been killed. there are literally dozens of children over 50 a day shot every day in our c
the kids want. got to answer all their letters to santa claus. >> that appreciation days honors dr. martin luther king but also honors the civil rights movement. >> i'll be glad to fire the first shot. i am not letting my country be ruled by a dictator, i'm not letting anybody take my guns, if it goes one inch further, i'm going to start killing people. >> i'm here to tell you, 1776 will commence again if you try to take our firearms, it doesn't manner how many lemmings you get out there on the street begging to have their guns taken, we will not relinquish them, do you understand that? >> not only larry ward but of rush limbaugh and the guy that appeared with pierce morgan. this growing extremism that we're hearing, no one is saying that americans don't have a constitutional right, their second amendment rights to owning a gun. isn't that the bigger point, the distinction to draw here, that these proposals aren't taking guns away from people? >> absolutely. and thomas the clips that you just showed, there you have it, those are the spokes people for the pro gun side. and therein lies the
of rhetoric. >> let me say this. this is the anniversary year of the march on washington, dr. martin luther king, who his holiday will be on monday when the president is inaugurated. in the famous speech he made, i have a dream, he referred to a governor whose lips drifts with the words of interposition and nullification. that is the words that we're hearing dripping from lips today. interposition and nullification. maybe when they said the president was trying to be a king, maybe they were talking about martin luther king. toure, david, thanks for your time tonight. and be sure to catch toure on "the cycle." >>> coming up, it's day 2 of the big gop unity retreat. a time for change. new blood. but why in the world are republicans asking paul ryan for advice on beating president obama? >>> and as the president surges in this second term, we have news tonight about the birther movement. and it might surprise you. >>> plus, 50 years since civil rights leader medgar evers was murdered. his legacy is living on through his wife. and i counted the civil rights movement. evers has a big moment at t
, congressman chaka fattah. >> thank you, mr. chairman. we are about to celebrate the life and legacy of dr. king and we are remooneded that on that balcony at the lorraine motel in memphis he was shot down. whether president reagan or president kennedy who were both shot, one killed and one almost fatally wounded, we are reminded here in washington all the time of the dangers of guns. that's why all of you went through the security protections to come into this building. and the supreme court that ruled that everyone has a right to bear arms also makes it clear you can't bring them into the supreme court. so -- that's because we actually know that guns are dangerous. and that -- as much as people may proclaim one thing, you have to look at the actions. on the floor of the house we saw members shot down once. that's why we have bulletproof things and other kinds of protections. mayor nutter is one who as someone growing up in west philadelphia, the best place in the world to grow up, as a former councilman and now as second term mayor of our city is in so many respects america's mayor now.
kennedy was her -- assassinated two days before i walked across the stage for graduation. dr. king, the one who got week engaged in politics, was assassinated earlier that year. even assassination attempt at a george wallace. it is no wonder things held together quite frankly. well, the congress passed what was then called the gun control act. among other things it said that felons, fugitives, drug users, those who have been adjudicated and it is not a politically correct phrase, but it is in the law, those that are mentally affected could not own a gun. 1994 as a world change in country changed, along with the thing i am proud is for having written and passed about. we added a new category of people who were prohibited from purchasing a gun. based on facts, not on fiction. that is those who had a restraining order issued against them in a domestic violence incident. that was a fight to get that added. then, two years later we expanded the list again to include anyone convicted of a misdemeanor violent crime, because there was some history that they were the most likely people to d
on the stock. >>> let's go to drew in california. >> caller: dr. cramer, l.a. kings stanley cup champ ba ba booyah to you. >> what's up? >> caller: thank you for getting me back in the game in 2012. my stock has a lot of insider buying. chesapeake, chk. >> a hard one to own frankly. i'll tell you why. my trust owns southwestern energy, which i think the ceo will tell you, is a darn good company. natural gas prices won't go up i feel. and i worry about the fact that that stock has too much natural gas exposure. chesapeake is only a hold, not a buy. >>> let's go to bill in wisconsin. >> caller: hi, a buckeye booyah to you from wisconsin. >> buckeyes, ohio? okay. >> caller: i'm interested in snts. >> profiled that stock in the first two years of the show and have not looked at that it in six years. i have to come back about santerus. i don't know how it's currently doing. >>> let's go to mike in florida. >> caller: jim, booyah, thank you for taking my call. >> you're welcome. >> caller: thank you. you've been really helpful to a new investor and made me some money. >> @jimcramer, always a deba
, the bible that dr. martin luther king carried with him during his travels and hosa parks' bible that she owned as a civil rights activist? >> rosa parks. >> yes. you're right. you're right. >> wow. congratulations. okay. so that's the one that won't be, but the other three will. >> he is using the in-laws' family bible in a small ceremony on monday. he is stacking the lincoln and martin luther king bibles. >> let's go back across to kath. we have kim kardashian with us, and it's her birthday from los angeles. who was the first president to be sworn in by a woman. president lyndon johnson, john kennedy, bill clinton, or george w. bush? >> bill clinton? [ buzzer ] >> you're a winner too. >> yes, you are. >> all right, kim kardashian gets my book. so the correct answer here, president lyndon johnson. >> lyndon johnson. you might remember that famous, famous picture on air force one after president kennedy was assassinated. he was sworn in by a dallas judge, sarah hughes. >> okay. well, thank you so much. that was -- we learned a lot, and kathie lee is going to come back across the street no
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)